Women’s Press
Canada’s leading academic feminist publisher
Canada’s leading academic feminist publisher
2016 recognition of being indigenous series cvr
360 pages
6 x 9 inches
April 2016
Print ISBN: 9780889615793
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Overview

Over 15 years ago, Kim Anderson set out to explore how Indigenous womanhood had been constructed and reconstructed in Canada, weaving her own journey as a Cree/Métis woman with the insights, knowledge, and stories of the forty Indigenous women she interviewed. The result was A Recognition of Being, a powerful work that identified both the painful legacy of colonialism and the vital potential of self-definition.

In this second edition, Anderson revisits her groundbreaking text to include recent literature on Indigenous feminism and two-spirited theory and to document the efforts of Indigenous women to resist heteropatriarchy. Beginning with a look at the positions of women in traditional Indigenous societies and their status after colonization, this text shows how Indigenous women have since resisted imposed roles, reclaimed their traditions, and reconstructed a powerful Native womanhood.

Featuring a new foreword by Maria Campbell and an updated closing dialogue with Bonita Lawrence, this revised edition will be a vital text for courses in women and gender studies and Indigenous studies as well as an important resource for anyone committed to the process of decolonization.


Related Titles


Table of Contents

Foreword, Maria Campbell
Preface to the New Edition
Acknowledgements
Introduction

PART I: SETTING OUT
Chapter 1: Story of the Storyteller
Chapter 2: Working with Notions of Tradition and Culture
Chapter 3: Literary and Oral Resources

PART II: LOOKING BACK: THE COLONIZATION OF NATIVE WOMANHOOD
Chapter 4: The Dismantling of Gender Equity
Chapter 5: Marriage, Divorce and Family Life
Chapter 6: The Construction of a Negative Identity

PART III: RESIST
Chapter 7: Foundations of Resistance
Chapter 8: Acts of Resistance
Chapter 9: Attitudes of Resistance

PART IV: RECLAIM
Chapter 10: Our Human Relations
Chapter 11: Relating to Creation

PART V: CONSTRUCT
Chapter 12: The Individual
Chapter 13: Family
Chapter 14: Community and Nation
Chapter 15: Creation

PART VI: ACT
Chapter 16: Nurturing Self
Chapter 17: Nurturing the Future

PART VII: PAUSE/REFlECT
Concluding Dialogue, Kim Anderson and Bonita Lawrence

Participant Biographies
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Kim Anderson

Dr. Kim Anderson is Associate Professor in the Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition at the University of Guelph. As an Indigenous (Metis) scholar, she has spent her career working to improve the health and well-being of Indigenous families in Canada. Much of her research is community partnered and has involved gender and Indigeneity, urban Indigenous knowledge, Indigenous masculinities, and Indigenous feminism. Her single-authored books include A Recognition of Being: Reconstructing Native Womanhood (2nd Edition, Canadian Scholars, 2016) and Life Stages and Native Women: Memory, Teachings and Story Medicine (University of Mainitoba Press, 2011). Recent co-edited books include Indigenous Men and Masculinities: Legacies, Identities, Regeneration (with Robert Alexander Innes, University of Manitoba Press, 2015), and Mothers of the Nations: Indigenous Mothering as Global Resistance, Reclaiming and Recovery (with Dawn Lavell-Harvard, 2014).

A Recognition of Being, A Recognition of Being, 2nd Edition

Reviews

"In this second edition, Kim Anderson beautifully weaves the stories of Indigenous women from the traditional teachings of our ancestors to the brutality of colonial ideologies designed to shame and disempower Indigenous women and their family units. A skilled storyteller herself, Kim Anderson’s narrative reveals how the teachings of our ancestors can help this generation emerge from the genocidal acts of the colonizers, with hope for the future. Told with truth, love, and respect, Kim’s work is a form of knowledge transmission and establishes for us the foundations of reconciliation: education, our history, and our strengths as Indigenous peoples."
—  Katsi'tsakwas Ellen Gabriel, Indigenous Human Rights and Environmental Activist, Kanien'kehá:ka Nation, Turtle Clan

"This is a groundbreaking contribution to Indigenous studies at the crossroads of interdisciplinary feminist theory and methods built on community-based voice, experience, and power. Foregrounding conceptual frameworks of Indigenous feminist consciousness founded in acts of resistance, reclaiming, constructing, acting, and reflecting, Kim Anderson’s book opens up paths of healing and resurgence against threats to Indigenous ways of being."
—  Margo Tamez, MFA, PhD, Indigenous Studies / Community, Culture and Global Studies, University of British Columbia

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