Women’s Press
Canada’s leading academic feminist publisher
Canada’s leading academic feminist publisher
2009 the push to prescribe cvr
297 pages
6 x 9 inches
July 2009
Print ISBN: 9780889614789
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Overview

In recent years, heated debate has surrounded the pharmaceutical industry and how it has gained unprecedented control over the evaluation, regulation, and promotion of its own products. As a result, drugs are produced, regulated, marketed, and used in ways that infiltrate many aspects of everyday life. The nature and extent of this infiltration, and how this has special meaning for women, are at the core of The Push to Prescribe.

This is an essential resource for a variety of courses in Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacology, Public Policy, Public Health, Health Policy, Women's Studies, Women's Health, as well as many Social Science courses in areas like Sociology and Political Science. It will also be of interest to a general audience, health professional organizations, government health associations, and consumer and women's groups.


Related Titles


Table of Contents

Foreword - Nancy Olivieri
Preface

Chapter 1: Introduction - The Steering Committee of Women and Health Promotion

Part I: The Push to Prescribe: Who Defines What Drugs We Need and How Do They Do It?

Chapter 2: "Ask Your Doctor": Women and Direct-to-Consumer Advertising - Barbara Mintzes

Chapter 3: Preventing Disease: Are Pills the Answer? - Sharon Batt and Abby Lippman

Chapter 4: Who Pays the Piper? Industry Funding of Patients' Groups - Sharon Batt

Part II: The Canadian Drug Regulatory Process

Chapter 5: Trials on Trial: Women and the Testing of Drugs - Abby Lippman

Chapter 6: Lifting the Curtain on the Drug Approval Process - Ann Silversides

Chapter 7: Reporting Adverse Drug Reactions: What Happens in the Real World? - Colleen Fuller

Chapter 8: Questioning Modernization: Legislative Change at Health Canada - Anne Rochon Ford

Chapter 9: Full Circle: Drugs, the Environment, and Our Health - Sharon Batt

Chapter 10: Finding a way Forward - The Steering Committee of Women and Health Protection

Further Reading
Related Websites
References
Copyright Acknowledgements
Index

Anne Rochon Ford

Anne Rochon Ford is the Coordinator of Women and Health Protection, a national working group mandated to provide research-based policy advice on the safety of prescription medication. Over the last decade, WHP has commissioned research on a range of topics within the field of women and pharmaceuticals, resulting in the body of work represented in this book.


Diane Saibil

Diane Saibil is a freelance writer and editor.


Reviews

"A compelling book about one of the major societal problems of this decade: the over-consumption of prescription drugs. Much of the information is original and certainly not available elsewhere. Books such as this are much needed to educate and engage people in finding solutions. Extremely valuable."

"Canada needs this book. If you're going to read any book about women and pharmaceuticals this year, this is the one."

"This book is invaluable in pulling together research findings from different literatrues and policy documents. I would strongly recommend it."

"This book is invaluable in pulling together research findings from different literatures and policy documents. I would strongly recommend it."

"This is a book that I would use to help students think critically about women's health needs. The authors capture the complexity surrounding women and pharmaceuticals and make a cogent argument for why Canadians need to think carefully about what we thought we already knew. They suggest that we need to reconsider previous assumptions about what is best for women, what is best for public health policy, and who is best suited to make these determinations. I will buy a copy for myself, my mother, and my daughter."

"This is a book that I would use to help students think critically about women's health needs. The authors capture the complexity surrounding women and pharmaceuticals and make a cogent argument for why Canadians need to think carefully about what we thought we already knew. They suggest that we need to reconsider previous assumptions about what is best for women, what is best for public health policy, and who is best suited to make these determinations. I will buy a copy for myself, my mother, and my daughter."
—  Peggy J. Kleinplatz, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa

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